Science Network Workshop Series
Register for Our March Webinars on Science Communication

It can be a boon to science and scientists when the media gets science right. But when the news perpetuates misinformation, it can have negative consequences for research, funding, and policy. So how do you communicate your expertise and knowledge effectively to reporters? And how do you fight back against misinformation when it’s the prevailing media trend?

<http://action.ucsusa.org/site/R?i=t_oKfy9D90sVlkZCwhZZpw>Register for our two upcoming webinars on communicating with the media. You’ll hear from scientists and science communication experts who have firsthand experience working with reporters to make sure that the facts, not myths, are the headline.

<http://action.ucsusa.org/site/R?i=QgOXvxPjn2S0UQCHUNPdHA>101: Rapid Response Ready: Preparing for media opportunities
Date: Wednesday, March 11
Time: 3:00 p.m. EDT
When a new story breaks, the media doesn’t have a lot of time to spend searching for experts. Our presenters are communications and scientific experts who can share with you how to build those relationships with the media, so that when a reporter needs scientific information from an expert, they know to look for you.

<http://action.ucsusa.org/site/R?i=13WZ7RMJ9yW1EEbUX_05FA>202: Pushing Back Against Misinformation
Date: Thursday, March 26
Time: 3:00 p.m. EDT
With 24/7 news and social media, everyone has their own platform to share their views. But when policy makers and the media are spreading scientific misinformation, the public deserves to hear the truth from the experts. Join us for a webinar filled with science communication tips on how to engage on contentious issues, how to frame your arguments so they aren’t reinforcing the myths, and how to push through the cacophony so the truth can be heard.

<http://action.ucsusa.org/site/R?i=kHXlvnSngLpysIn_c5qTUg>Register today for our upcoming skills-based online workshops.

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