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REMINDER – The East-West Center Arts Program presents

Music of the Himalayas

Saturday, April 18, 2015, 8:00–9:30 p.m.
Sunday, April 19, 2015, 4:00–5:30 p.m.
EWC Imin Center – Jefferson Hall

The Himalayamountain range, home of Mt. Everest and the birthplace of the Buddha, is rich with history, art, and culture. These concerts will highlight the diverse musical traditions of the region, including both the folkmusic of Nepal and classical ragas.Acclaimed local and visiting artists will enchant audiences with the Nepali folk sarangi, classical sarangi, tabla drums,madal drums, bansuri flute, voice, and tanpura.

Tickets:
$20 general
$10 youth (17 & under), college students
$15 seniors (60+),military, EWC/UH faculty & staff

http://ewcarts.bpt.me
1-800-838-3006 (24/7, toll-free)
At the door, one hour before showtime

Generous support provided by Aston Hotels & Resorts, the Society of Nepalese in Hawai‘i (SNEHA), and Himalayan Kitchen.

EWC Arts Programs are supported by the Hawai‘i Pacific Rim Society, Friends of Hawai‘i Charities, Jackie Chan Foundation USA, Richard H. Cox, Barbara B. Smith, EWC Arts ‘Ohana members, and other generous donors.

http://arts.EastWestCenter.org

 

https://searchjobs.dartmouth.edu/postings/30112

Position Title
Department     Dean of the College
Position Number     0120701
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In the forty years since the Kemeny administration’s reinvigoration of the College’s founding ideals, Dartmouth has established its preeminence among peer institutions in the recruitment, retention, breadth, and achievements of the American Indian student population. Dartmouth’s Native American Program (NAP) is an exemplary model, and, it is grounded in the following core commitments which the Director proactively upholds: support for Native American education; facilitation of the holistic development of Native students; reflection of the value that self-determination has in the lives of Native students; maintenance and expression of Native American cultural identity; and, cultivation of a strong ethic of community engagement within the College community, its Native communities and its external relationships.
Position Purpose

The Director of the Native American Program (NAP) will be to guide the vision, development and implementation of a dynamic program; and, to provide direction, leadership, and consultation in the educational, social, cultural, and personal development of Native American students at Dartmouth College. These priorities are accomplished through: 1) Program Vision, Development, Implementation and Evaluation 2) Student Advising and Mentoring 3) Community Advocacy 4) Budget and Personnel Administration, and 5) Community Engagement and Collaboration. We seek a student-centered colleague with a deep commitment to the wellness and academic achievement of Native students, a passion for collaboration and respect for diverse points of view, and a strong desire to work as part of a community.

Performance Announcement

Performance Announcement

 

Music of the Himalayas

A concert of classical and folk music of Nepal

 

Saturday, April 18, 2015, 8:00–9:30 p.m.

 

Sunday, April 19, 2015, 4:00–5:30 p.m.

 

Hawaii Imin International Conference Center at Jefferson Hall

East-West Center

 

 

 

The Himalaya mountain range, home of Mt. Everest and the birthplace of the Buddha, is rich with history, art, and culture. These concerts will highlight the diverse musical traditions of the region, including both the folk music of Nepal and classical ragas. Acclaimed local and visiting artists will enchant audiences with the Nepali folk sarangi, classical sarangi, tabla drums, madal drums, bansuri flute, voice, and tanpura.

 

Featuring:

 

Parashuram Bhandari – sarangi (bowed lute)

Ram Kumar Singh – bansuri (bamboo flute)

Abhijit Banerjee – tabla (drums)

Anna Stirr – voice, madal (drums)

Babette Ackin – tanpura (plucked lute)

 

 

 

Tickets:

$20 general

$10 youth (17 & under), college students

$15 seniors (60+), military, EWC/UH faculty & staff

 

http://ewcarts.bpt.me | 1-800-838-3006 (24/7, toll-free) At the door, one hour before showtime

 

 

Generous support provided by Aston Hotels & Resorts and the Society of Nepalese in Hawai‘i (SNEHA)

 

EWC Arts Programs are supported by the Hawai‘i Pacific Rim Society, Friends of Hawai‘i Charities, Jackie Chan Foundation USA, Richard H. Cox, Barbara B. Smith, EWC Arts ‘Ohana members, and other generous donors.

 

For further information: 944-7177

http://arts.EastWestCenter.org

 

Washington State Dept of Natural Resources
Fish and Wildlife Biologist 4-Environmental Analyst
Recruitment # 2015-04-6753-03349

SALARY RANGE: $ 3,819 – $ 5,010 per month plus comprehensive benefit package and retirement.
Location: Scenic Olympia, Washington
CLOSES: May 3, 2014

This exciting position is on DNR’s forest land planning team. The forest land planning team, which is part of DNR’s Forest Resources Division, is responsible for developing forest land plans, environmental impact statements, and other major planning and environmental documents for the sustainable forest management (including timber harvest) of state trust lands in Washington state. Balancing the production of revenue with ecological, social, and other values through planning is one of the team’s primary challenges.

The person in this position will serve as the team’s wildlife specialist. As a senior biologist, this person will:
*Act as the forest land planning team expert on wildlife ecology, the DNR’s State Trust Lands Habitat Conservation Plan, and DNR policies and procedures regarding wildlife.
*Analyze the potential environmental impacts of forest management activities on habitat for northern spotted owls, marbled murrelets, and other listed and non-listed wildlife species for major forest land planning efforts such as the sustainable harvest calculation. This analysis will be performed by synthesizing the ecology of the species with agency policies and procedures and using computer models, GIS, databases, and other analytical tools to determine potential impacts.
*Update and develop ecologically informed analysis tools that incorporate sound science.
*Interpret and communicate analysis results to managers to guide forest land planning and other management decisions. Suggest alternatives, mitigation, and other management solutions.
*Write clear, concise, reader-friendly sections of environmental (NEPA/SEPA) and forest land planning documents and participate in revision process with team members.
*Work with a team of analysts and planners to respond to public comments on environmental and planning documents.
*Provide technical review and coordinate scientific analysis related to ecological issues done by contractors.
*Research and write ecological papers, including resource assessments.
*Assist with public presentations and stakeholder meetings; provide background information concerning strategies related to wildlife issues.
*Working with Region and other Division staff, assist in implementing new forest land plans, policies, and procedures.

REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS:

*A master’s degree in wildlife ecology and conservation or wildlife biology or a bachelor’s degree in wildlife ecology and conservation or wildlife biology and a minimum of five years of professional experience in wildlife management or research or habitat management or research.
*Knowledge of wildlife ecology, wildlife habitat management and research, endangered and threatened species management, forest ecology, landscape ecology, and the scientific method, which is demonstrated by the ability to conduct independent research, analyze data, and write discussions on major topics related to wildlife and endangered species for environmental impact statements.
*Knowledge of statistical theory and techniques and research methods, which is demonstrated by the ability to identify and define research problems, determine the extent and type of data needed, and implement results of research/analysis.
*Demonstrated knowledge of harvest techniques, silviculture, and forest inventory, and the ability to express that knowledge through effective written and oral communication.
*Demonstrated ability to speak and write effectively, participate in public meetings, and produce presentations for specific audiences, including management, the public, and stakeholders.
*Demonstrated ability to present papers and posters at scientific conferences.
*Demonstrated ability to work as a team member on team projects.
*Proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite (Outlook, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint).

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND HOW TO APPLY PLEASE GO: TO:http://agency.governmentjobs.com/dnr/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=1120116

Questions? Please contact Heidi Tate at phone number (360) 902-1662/Heidi.Tate@dnr.wa.gov or e-mail us at DNRrecruiting@dnr.wa.gov.

For an example of a current major planning effort currently underway, please visit the Olympic Experimental State Forest (OESF) forest land planning website at the following link:
http://www.dnr.wa.gov/ResearchScience/Topics/StateTrustLandsForestManagement/Pages/lm_flp_oesf.aspx

Melody Wolf
Agency Recruiter
Human Resources Division
Washington State Department Natural Resources (DNR)
360-902-1350
Melody.Wolf@dnr.wa.gov<mailto:Melody.Wolf@dnr.wa.gov>
www.dnr.wa.gov/aboutdnr/employment<http://www.dnr.wa.gov/aboutdnr/employment>

Earn three credits in two weeks, while immersing yourself in the beautiful environment and climate of the southern Appalachian Mountains in North Carolina. Classes are filling up – below is the list of classes that still have space available.

The Highlands Biological Station, an inter-institutional research center of the University of North Carolina, is offering its 2015 series of summer courses and workshops that can be taken for undergraduate OR graduate credit toward your academic program.  The following list of field-based courses and workshops are focused on the diversity of organisms in the region with special emphasis on identification and collection techniques as well as principles of evolution, ecology and conservation.  Scholarships, Grants-in-aid of research for graduate students, and summer internships also available. Highlands, North Carolina, is located in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains, at an average elevation about 3,800 feet, and situated near the Nantahala National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Cherokee Indian Reservation, Appalachian Trail, and the Blue Ridge Parkway.  For more information and to apply, visit www.highlandsbiological.org or call 828-526-2602.

2015 Schedule:
Courses (2 weeks)
Southern Appalachian Mayflies, Stoneflies & Caddisflies (June 29-July 10) with Dr. John Morse, Clemson University
Conservation Biology in the Field (June 22-July 3) with Dr. Peter White, UNC-Chapel Hill
Applied Landscape Conservation of Amphibians (July 13-24) with Dr. Ray Semlitsch, University of Missouri; Dr. Bill Peterman, University of Illinois
Evolution in the Blue Ridge for science educators (Aug. 3-14) with Dr. Kefyn Catley, Western Carolina University (WCU); Dr. Jim Costa, Highlands Biological Station & WCU; Dr. Louise Mead, BEACON Center of Michigan State University

Academic Workshops (5 days)
Biology & Identification of Ferns (May 25-29) with Dr. Joey Shaw, University of Tennessee-Chattanooga
Molecular Methods (May 25-29) with Dr. Indrani Bose, Western Carolina University
Introduction to Lichens  (June 15-19) with Dr. James Lendemer, NY Botanical Garden; Jessica Allen, New York Botanical Garden and The City University of New York
Literary Journeys Through the Western North Carolina Landscape (July 13-17) with Mr. Brent Martin, The Wilderness Society
Bryophyte Identification (Aug. 3-7) with Dr. Paul Davison, University of North Alabama

Non-Academic Workshops
Rare Lichen Identification (June 11-13) with Dr. James Lendemer, NY Botanical Garden; Jessica Allen, New York Botanical Garden and The City University of New York
Natural Science Illustration in Black & White (June 29-July 3) with Dr. Lore Ruttan, Lore Ruttan Illustration
Natural Science Illustration in Color (July 6-10) with Dr. Lore Ruttan, Lore Ruttan Illustration
Blooms, Berries & Buds: Recognizing Our Native Flora (July 20-24) (July 20-24) with Dr. Larry Mellichamp, UNC-Charlotte
Introduction to Southern Appalachian Fleshy Fungi & Their Identification (July 27-31) (July 27-31) with Mr. Jay Justice, Mycologist; Dr. Richard Baird, Mississippi State University
Automation of Environmental Sensing (Aug. 10-14) with Mr. John Kauffman, Arlington, VA Public Schools

Check website for course applications, cost and credit information, housing options, detailed descriptions, and prerequisite requirements:  http://www.highlandsbiological.org/summer-2015/

——
Michelle S. Ruigrok
Program Assistant, Highlands Biological Station
265 N. 6th St.  |  Highlands, NC 28741
Tel: (828) 526-2602  |  Fax: (828) 526-2797
E-mail: msruigrok@email.wcu.edu
www.highlandsbiological.org

Mission: To foster research and education focused on the rich natural heritage of the Highlands Plateau.

An inter-institutional center of the University of North Carolina, administered by Western Carolina University

We’re recruiting a new Assistant Professor (i.e. lecturer) in Tropical
Sciences at the University of Nottingham. This is a permanent position.
We’re especially keen to bring in someone working in ecology and
conservation, though would be open to applicants in behaviour or physiology
as well. Essentially we want someone with whole-organism interests in the
tropics. For the full advertisement see:

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AKX214/assistant-professor-in-tropical-biology/

The position is being created because we need someone to run our new
Tropical Sciences degree and contribute to teaching on it. This will
commence in 2016, and any new appointment can expect to be protected for the
first couple of years to allow them to develop their research. The new
degree will be a split-site undergraduate program with two years in the UK
and one year on our campus in Malaysia, just outside KL. Candidates with
experience of working in Malaysia will therefore be particularly welcome.

We have a very friendly and collaborative group here, which has been growing
steadily over the last few years. People at Nottingham with major research
interests in the tropics include Adam Algar, Richard Field, Ahimsa Campos-
Arceiz, Sofie Sjogersten, and myself. This is only a small part of a much
larger ecology and evolution section though. Our website hasn’t been updated
for a few years but see http://ecology.nottingham.ac.uk for some idea of
what goes on here and by all means ask if you’d like to know more.

Please share this advertisement widely with anyone you know who might be
interested. This is a genuinely open call and we’re excited about bringing
in another colleague who will expand our current interests. I’m happy to
answer any general enquiries though specific questions about the position
should go through Prof. Jan Bradley who is the academic lead.

All the best,

Markus

FYI

Educators—It’s April and Earth Day is around the corner. Join us for the momentous launch of the inaugural Climate Education Week April 18th-25th! Earth Day Network has released a free toolkit to assist educators in instructing the basics and importance of climate change. www.climateeducationweek.org

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Cincinnati Procurement Operations Division, is pleased to announce a student services contract opportunity for the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division in the Office of Research and Development (ORD) in Ada, Oklahoma. The EPA is seeking a student or recent graduate to provide support to the Safety Health and Environmental Management Program (SHEMP).

 

Please post this announcement in an area where students will see it. You may forward this email to individual students or recent graduates. Applications must be received by 5:00 PM EST Friday, May 8, 2015.The announcement is attached to this email and it will be available on the following website: www.FedConnect.net – click on Search Public Opportunities and use Reference Number RFQ-OH-15-00044.

 

All applications must be submitted via FedConnect (www.fedconnect.net). Instructions on how to submit applications are contained in the announcement. The process to apply via FedConnect is lengthy, please allow for at least two weeks to complete the registrations.

 

Thank you,

 

 

Lisa Ryle

Cincinnati Procurement Operations Division
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Phone: 513-487-2851
Fax: 513-487-2115
Email: ryle.lisa@epa.gov
http://intranet.epa.gov/oamintra/CPOD/

 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
How can 1100 tree species coexist in 25 hectares of tropical forest? The successful applicant
will assist with ongoing research in Yasuni National Park in the Ecuadorian Amazon that seeks to
address this question using plant functional traits and spatial pattern analyses. The research will
involve sampling trees for functional traits within a highly-diverse tree plot and the taking of
measurements in a laboratory at the nearby field station. The station is large and modern, with
AC, showers and WiFi.

TIMELINE AND LOGISTICS:
The research will take place from early June through late July and possibly into August. Airfare
and station fees covering food and lodging will be paid for, but salary is not provided.

DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS:
Enthusiasm for research and a curiosity about ecology, the ability to hike / be on your feet for
several hours in humid conditions amid insects and across steep terrain.

TO APPLY:
Send your name, degree level (undergraduate, recently graduated), and a brief description of
why you are interested in this position to Ian McFadden: imcfaddn@umd.edu